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Georgia job application gave false picture of prison doctor’s career

As part of the application Dr. Yvon Nazaire submitted to become medical director at Pulaski State Prison, he stated that he was working as an attending physician in the emergency rooms of three New York hospitals.

But that’s not what Nazaire told a bankruptcy judge in a series of court filings at roughly the same time. According to those documents, the doctor was unemployed — and had been for months — when he was hired for his job in the Georgia prison system.

Document: Nazaire’s resume

Nazaire’s resume states he was an attending physician in the emergency departments at Wyckoff Heights Medical Center, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center and Bayley Seton Medical Center, with dates of employment for all three listed as “1998-present.”

Other evidence also points to discrepancies between what Nazaire said about his professional credentials in his September 2006 application and how his career actually played out, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution found in researching Nazaire’s past.

One of the New York hospitals cited by Nazaire on the application as an employer in 2006 had, in fact, shut down in 1999, a hospital official confirmed.

Another hospital he listed hadn’t employed him since 2003, he acknowledged in a deposition.

Providing false information on a state job application in Georgia can be prosecuted as a felony that carries a maximum sentence of five years in prison and a $1,000 fine. And the state on occasion has pressed such charges.

In May, for example, the director of human resources for the Georgia Department of Public Health pleaded guilty to seven counts of making false statements for claiming college degrees and employment experience she didn’t have. The HR director, Donna Alexander, was sentenced to 30 months’ probation and fined $1,000.

Nazaire acknowledged in an interview with the AJC that he was unemployed when he sought his position at Pulaski. When he cited the three hospitals on his resume as current employers, he said he meant that he hadn’t been fired from them.

One of the New York hospitals cited by Nazaire on the application as an employer in 2006 had, in fact, shut down in 1999, a hospital official confirmed.

“Maybe what I put (on the resume) I put it the wrong way,” he said. “I don’t have anything to hide.”

He said he was out of work because a hospital that employed him in New York had filed for bankruptcy and could no longer cover his malpractice insurance.

Dr. Edward Bailey, who was the medical director at Georgia Correctional Health Care when Nazaire was hired, declined to answer questions from the AJC regarding whether the information the physician submitted was checked for accuracy.

Bankruptcy filings

Nazaire, who was hired at an annual salary of $150,000 and currently makes $174,300, did not complete the employment section of the application. Instead, he provided a resume that said he was an attending physician in the emergency departments at Wyckoff Heights Medical Center, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center and Bayley Seton Medical Center. For all three, the resume listed the dates of employment as “1998-present.”

Nazaire’s signature appears under a statement saying the applicant affirms that the information on the application or accompanying resume is “true and complete.”

Court documents show otherwise.

Document: Bankruptcy filings

In a personal bankruptcy case, Nazaire and his attorney filed petitions stating that the doctor, after seven months of unemployment, had found a job in Georgia making it possible for him to make his payments.

At that time, Nazaire was involved in a personal bankruptcy case in New Jersey that required him to make monthly payments to the trustee. After he fell behind and was facing default, he and his attorney filed petitions stating that the doctor, after seven months of unemployment, had found a job in Georgia making it possible for him to pay.

In a deposition that was part of a medical malpractice case stemming from a death in the Wycokoff Heights ER, Nazaire acknowledged that he stopped working at that hospital in 2003.

As for Bayley Seton Hospital, the well-known Staten Island landmark closed its ER in 1999 due to financial problems, a spokesman said.

A spokewoman for Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, the third employer Nazaire listed on his resume, declined to provide information about him.

More questions

Nazaire’s Georgia job application isn’t the only place where he has provided inaccurate or incomplete information.

On an application to work at Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center in New York in 2004, he stated that he had a bachelor’s of science degree from Jersey City State College. However, in the Wyckoff Heights deposition, he testified that he left college to go to medical school in his native Haiti and never graduated.

Dr. Yvon Nazaire’s official Department of Corrections photo.

“Actually, I missed the English part (of his degree requirements),” he testified.

Ellen Wayman-Gordon, an assistant vice president at the school, now known as New Jersey City University, confirmed that Nazaire was a student from 1977 to 1980 but did not graduate.

Nazaire also signed an employment agreement with Kingsbrook stating he was board certified in emergency medicine, a requirement for all physicians working in the facility’s ER.

However, the hospital withdrew its employment offer after learning Nazaire had failed the oral portion of the exam and was not board certified, according to documents in a court case stemming from the matter.

In Georgia, Nazaire’s profile on the Georgia Composite Medical Board website accurately states that he was placed on probation by the New York State Board for Professional Medical Conduct in 2004 for “quality of care” issues. However, it states, “This physician has indicated that he/she has NO medical malpractice court judgments and/or arbitration awards against his/her license.” In New York, Nazaire’s insurance carrier paid $2.55 million of a $3 million settlement involving a patient’s death, court records show.